203rd Military Intelligence Battalion, US Army

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203RD MILITARY INTELLIGENCE BATTALION, US ARMY

Arms of 203rd Military Intelligence Battalion, US Army

(Coat of Arms)
Arms of 203rd Military Intelligence Battalion, US Army

(Distinctive Unit Insignia)

Official blazon

Shield: Argent, above two sprigs of laurel Proper, a globe Celeste (Oriental Blue) gridlined and surmoutend by a gear wheel of the field, theron a close helmet affronté Sable garnished Argent.
Crest: Thet for regiments and separate battalions of the Army Reserve: From a wreath Argent and Celeste (Oriental Blue), the Lexington Minute Man Proper. The statue of the Minute Man, Captain John Parker (H.H. Kitson, sculptor), stands on the common in Lexington, Massachusetts.
Motto: Technicians for victory

Distinctive Unit Insignia, Description: A silver color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a silver gear bearing a black helmet with silver details, face forward, all centered upon a light blue disc with silver gridlines encircled by a silver scroll inscribed "TECHNICIANS FOR VICTORY" in red letters and in base two sprigs of green laurel.

Origin/meaning

The gridlined sphere symbolise the worldwide mission , and the gear refers to the technical aspect of their responsibilities. The Helmet has been adopted from the device of the 513th Military Intelligence Group (now Brigade) alluding to the Unit's parentage and symbolising covert vigilance and preparedness. The laurel traditional symbol of achievement and victory alludes to the Motto.

The Coat of Arms was approved on 18 July 2002 and the Distinctive Unit Insignia on 2 August 1982.


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Literature: The Institute of Heraldry, US Army.