29th Field Artillery Regiment, US Army

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29TH FIELD ARTILLERY REGIMENT, US ARMY

center Arms of 29th Field Artillery Regiment, US Army
Arms of 29th Field Artillery Regiment, US Army

Official blazon

Shield: Gules, a sunflower slipped and leaved between two shells erect Or.
Crest: On a wreath Or and Gules, a trident palewise Azure, the cross bar bearing 8 bezants over the tines a mullet of 7 points of the first charged with an estoile of 6 points of the second, all surmounting a pair of artillery rammers saltirewise Gold.
Motto: FIDELIS ET VERUS (Faithful And True).

Distinctive Unit Insignia. Description: A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 11/64 inches (2.98 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules, a sunflower slipped and leaved between two shells erect Or. Attached below and to the sides of the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “FIDELIS ET VERUS” in Red letters.

Origin/meaning

Scarlet is the color of the Artillery. The functions of the organization are represented by the two shells placed on either side of the sunflower which represents the state of activation, Kansas. Crest: The crest alludes to the landing of the 29th Artillery on the Normandy Beaches on 6 June 1944 for which the organization was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation. In this seaborne assault the 29th Artillery was part of Combat Team 8, the first combat team to land in the VII Corps sector on the right flank of the Allied invasion. The trident alludes to “Operation Neptune” which launched the Normandy assault and in this instance is blue in reference to the award of the Presidential Unit Citation. The 7 pointed mullet alludes to the VII Corps and is similar in silhouette to its shoulder sleeve insignia. The 8 bezants refer to Combat Team 8 and the 6 pointed star (from the coat of arms of Cherbourg) to the Cotentin Peninsula. The mullet and star also simulate a shell burst. The rammers, aside from their functional use in loading the pieces are used to symbolize “ramming home” the Normandy landing, the pushing forward in subsequent actions and final victory.

The coat of arms was originally approved for the 29th Field Artillery Battalion on 5 January 1943. It was redesignated for the 29th Artillery Regiment on 14 August 1958. It was amended to add a crest on 19 January 1966. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 September 1971, for the 29th Field Artillery Regiment. The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 29th Field Artillery Battalion on 26 June 1953. It was redesignated for the 29th Artillery Regiment on 14 August 1958. The insignia was redesignated effective 1 September 1971, for the 29th Field Artillery Regiment.



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Literature: Information from The Institute of Heraldry, US Army.