37th Engineer Battalion, US Army

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37TH ENGINEER BATTALION, US ARMY

Coat of arms (crest) of the 37th Engineer Battalion, US Army

Official blazon

Shield: Gules, a rock Argent whithin a garland of oak leaves and acorns Proper. Crest: On a wreath of the colors Argent and Gules, a demi-eagle dispalyed Sable, armed and langued Gules, collared Or, charged on the breast with a fleur-de-lis Argent, debruised in base by an escallop Gold. Motto: Fortuna infortuna forti una = Fortune of Misfortune is all the same to the Man of Stout Heart.

Origin/meaning

The Shield is red for engineers. The Rock taken from the Arms of St. Mihiel, and the oak leaves, embelmatic of the Meuse-Argonne, indicated service of the oragnization in World War I. The demi-eagle symbolises service in World War I, the collar of ring symbolises the Nibelungen Ring and alludes to serice in the Rhineland during World War II. The Fleur-de-lis symbolises service in France during both World Wars. The escallop symbolises the decorations awarded the Battalion for action in Normandy.

The Coat of Arms was originally approved for the 37th Engineers (General Service) on 4 March 1935. It was amende to correct the spelling of the Motto on 3 May 1935. It was redesignated for the 37th Engineer Regiment (Combat) on 27 September 1941. On 30 August 1943, the insignia was redesignated for the 37th Engineer Combat Battalion. The insignia was redesignated for the 37th Engineer Battalion (Combat) on 18 May 1955. The Coat of Arms was redesignated for the 37th Engineer Battalion and amended to include a Crest on 13 May 1987.

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