131st Signal Battalion, Alabama Army National Guard

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131ST SIGNAL BATTALION, ALABAMA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

Coat of arms (crest) of the 131st Signal Battalion, Alabama Army National Guard

Official blazon

Shield: Gules, a pile between two projectiles, palewise Or, on a chief double-arched Azure, a mullet Argent.
Crest: That for the regiments and separate battalions of the Alabama National Guard: On a wreath of the colors, Or and Gules, a slip of cotton plant with full bursting boll, Proper.
Motto: PREPARED AND READY.

Distinctive Unit Insignia. Description: A gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86cm) in height overall consisting a shield blazoned: Gules, a pile between two projectiles, palewise Or, on a chief double-arched Azure, a mullet Argent. Attached below the shield a Blue motto scroll inscribed "PREPARED AND READY" in gold letters.

Origin/meaning

The predominant scarlet and gold of the Coast Artillery arm, the firing functions of the organization are indicated by the two projectiles ready for instantaneous action. The pile is representative of the search light beam used in connection with the antiaircraft functions. The double arch in chief represents the sky and the place of activation, the State of Texas, symbolized by the silver star. The motto is expressive of the alertness of the personnel.

The Coat of Arms and Distinctive Unit Insignia was originally approved for the 512th Coast Artillery Regiment in 22 Sep 1942. They was redesignated for the 216th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion on 27 Jun 1952. They was redesignated for the 131st Signal Battalion in 25 Oct 1960.



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Literature: Image and Information from The Institute of Heraldry, US Army