155th Chemical Battalion, Ohio Army National Guard

From Heraldry of the World
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Logo-new.jpg
Heraldry of the World
Usa.jpg
US heraldry portal
Civic heraldry of the United States
Usa.flag.gif

155TH CHEMICAL BATTALION, OHIO ARMY NATIONAL GUARD

Arms of 155th Chemical Battalion, Ohio Army National Guard

(Coat of Arms)
Arms of 155th Chemical Battalion, Ohio Army National Guard

(Distinctive Unit Insignia)


Official blazon

Shield: Per chevron abased Azure and Gules, a hexagon in chief surmounted by a chevronnel Or, counterchanged of the field, in base a hydra of the field.
Crest: That for regiments and separate battalions of the Ohio Army National Guard: From a wreath Or and Azure, a sheaf of seventeen arrows Argent bound by a sprig of buckeye (aesculus glabra) fructed Proper (two leaves with bursting burr).
Motto: The Fog of War.

Distinctive Unit Insignia, Description, On a hexagon shaped Gold colored metal and enamel device 1 3/16 inches (3.02 cm) in heigth overall Blaoned: Azure, a quatrefoil throughout Or, charged in its bottom lobe with a guze bearing three mullets, one and two, of the like, and issuant threre from a hydra of as many heads of the field detailed of the second. Below the Blue scroll inscribed "THE FOG OF WAR" in Gold letters.

Origin/meaning

Yellow and Blue are the traditional colors for the Chemical Corps. The hexagon shape reflcts the benzene ring. The checron division allude to the swallowtail design of the Ohio State Flag. The The Coat of Arms and the Distinctive Unit Insignia, was both approved on 11 December 2006. The Hydra alludes to the Dragon in the chemical Corps Insignia, and to the multiple missions of the Battalion. The Three Stars in the Distinctive Unit Insignia signify the three campaigns awarded to the ancestor Units during World War II.


Follow us on Facebook.jpg

(when sharing use #heraldryoftheworld when possible)

Donate.jpg

Click on the image to see how to support the site !
Rate these arms / rate this page :
0.00
(0 votes)

(no information about you is stored when voting, only the vote itself is stored)


Literature: The Institute of Heraldry, US Army