Institution of Chemical Engineers

From Heraldry of the World
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Logo-new.jpg
Heraldry of the World
United Kingdom.jpg
British heraldry portal
Civic heraldry of the United Kingdom
Unitedkingdom-flag.gif

Overseas possessions


  • Total pages in the British section : 3,288

INSTITUTION OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS

Arms of Institution of Chemical Engineers

Official blazon

Arms : Argent, a bend per bend indented azure and gules between in chief a millrind sable and in base a salamander sable in flames proper.
Crest: On a wreath of the colours, Issuant from waves of the sea proper a dolphin erect vert, finned and bearded gules, between two long S's, being the mathematical sigxis of an integral, the dexter sign contoumee Or.
Supporters: On the dexter side a figure representing Pal!as Athene proper, and on the sinister side a figure representing Hephaestus proper.
Motto: Findendo fingere disco

Origin/meaning

The arms were officially granted on October 15, 1963.

The shield is divided into two parts to represent the profession as a whole and the special part played by chemical engineering. The indentations on the bend signify the cascade nature of many chemical engineering processes. The salamander represents the 'fiery' arts of chemistry (the crucible of medieval extractive metallurgy was called a salamander), while a millrind is symbolic of engineering — corn milling being a most ancient continuous process.

The heraldic dolphin in the crest is a symbol of the intellectual nature of chemical engineering and its connection with motion in fluids, while the integral signs illustrate the essential partnership with mathematics.

Regarding the supporters, Pallas Athene (Greeg Godess of Wisdom) represents wisdom and Hephaestus (the Greek god of blacksmiths, metalworking, carpenters, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metallurgy, fire, and volcanoes) signifies craftsmanship.

The motto may be interpreted as 'I learn to make by separating' — Findendo fingere disco


Follow us : Facebook.jpgInstagram.png
(when sharing images on Instagram, use #heraldryoftheworld)

Literature : image from https://www.theheraldrysociety.com/; Campbell-Kease, 1990