Bedlingtonshire

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  • Overseas possessions
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BEDLINGTONSHIRE (Urban District Council)

Incorporated into: 1974 Wansbeck

Arms (crest) of Bedlingtonshire

Official blazon

Arms : Argent, a cross formy quadrate between four lozenges sable; on a chief azure, a long-ship, bows on, proper, the sail set also argent charged with a like cross, pennon flying gules, between two lions rampant respectant also proper, each holding in the interior paw as many lightning flashes in saltire Or.
Crest : On a wreath of the colours, a Bedlington terrier proper, the forepaws on a coal tub loaded sable.
Motto: 'De profundis'

Origin/meaning

The arms were officially granted on June 1, 1962.

The Cross of St Cuthbert refers to the fact that Bedlingtonshire was anciently an exclave of County Durham after Bedlington and the hamlets belonging to it were bought by Cutheard, bishop of Durham, between 900 and 915, and although locally situated in Northumberland, it became part of the County Palatine of Durham, over which Bishop Walcher was granted royal rights by William the Conqueror. The parish church is also dedicated to St Cuthbert. It is reputed that the church takes its dedication from an event that occurred December 12, 1069: fleeing northwards from the Conqueror's army, the monks of Durham are said to have rested the body of St Cuthbert in Bedlington Church. The black diamonds and the coal tub refer to coal mining referring to one of the areas main industries.

The Bedlington Terrier is a breed of small dog named after Bedlington and was originally bred to hunt vermin in mines.Literature:


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